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Community Relations

Reginald F. Lewis Museum Partnership

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Given the current racial climate, Kaiser Permanente and the Reginald F. Lewis Museum will host a series of online events titled Still We Rise. The series will address how our communities are struggling and surviving under the current climate of social injustice. An overview of each event is outlined below:
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The Power of Motherhood – August 26, 6 p.m.
Keynote speaker : Sybrina Fulton (mother of Trayvon Martin)

This virtual discussion will recognize the resilience of mothers who’ve lost children to gun violence or police brutality. Hear them speak out about these vital issues and more, such as systemic racism and criminal-justice reform. Panelists will also engage in a dialogue about the disparities experienced by women of color as they navigate the health care system.
How are the Children? – September 30, 6 p.m. Keynote speaker : Dr. Lisa Delpit, Author and MacArthur “Genius” Fellow

This conversation will focus on how the COVID-19 pandemic has interrupted the daily lives’ of school children, and specifically how the lack of access to food, technology, and parental support are affecting disadvantaged children now more than ever. This web-based event will also address the subject of mental health, and what long-term impact these disparities will have on children’s education and overall well-being.
Endangered in America: The State of Black Men – October 8, 6 p.m. Keynote speaker : Marc Morial, President and CEO of the National Urban League

It’s highly chronicled that African American men have the lowest life expectancy than any other demographic group in this country, regardless of economic status.1 Many historical, social, economic, physical, and biological risk factors shape the life course of black men and contribute to their increased rates of premature morbidity and mortality. During this program, subject matter experts will highlight the major factors that lead to the high mortality rates of African American males.
1Pathak EB. J Racial Ethn. Health Disparities, 2018.

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